Architecture / Bath / England / Exploration

Discover Bath The Golden Coloured City

Many tourists are likely drawn to Bath to walk the streets that Jane Austen once did.  Though she lived there only a short time Austen and Bath are inextricably linked so I found it quite amusing to learn that she was not a huge fan.  She is also quoted as once saying ‘…Bath is pleasant enough, but beyond that, it is the most tiresome place in the world.’

Georgian Architecture - Bath

I was not drawn to make a literary pilgrimage but to visit the Roman Bath.  I was in Bristol visiting my cousin for the weekend who has been insisting we go since I moved here.  We finally ventured via bus to Bath from Bristol and had a great day out.

Hop on Hop off bus - Bath

I tend to avoid hop on hop off bus tours but decided to give one a go for our trip.  It was a good option to get a lot of random facts about the city and its history but I’m unlikely to use them in future although now that I’ve been in London for this long I’d like to do one there.

The bus took a loop around the city showcasing points of interest, attractions and shops.  We started our journey then decided to stop at the Roman Bath to ensure we had enough time to see everything.  It was by far the highlight of the trip.

This attraction is well laid out in that it ushers visitors through one straight path allowing you to see everything and avoiding creating one congested area.  The stunning view of the open bath with the other buildings in the back drop on the street is one that the Romans never experienced.

There once was a roof and the bath still has a working pump which provides energy for the bath today and the entire centre.  At the end you can taste some of this water, I admit it wasn’t pleasant.  Inside the bath houses a museum which tells visitors more about the settlement that was Aquae Sulis.

Museum - Roman Baths England

After learning about the Romans and the community they had we grabbed some lunch and ate in the nearby Parade Gardens.  There is a small entrance fee but it was pretty, clean and pristine and very much worth the £1.

Parade Gardens - Bath England

Parade Gardens 2 - Bath England

Following our lunch by the water we walked back to the starting point of the hop on off bus route which starts at the Abbey.  Stunning as Bath Abbey was we skipped a visit, but if you want to go entrance is by £2.50 donation for adults.

Bath Abbey - Bath England

We jumped back on the bus to bring us to the other parts of the city that we missed.  This was also where we found out about the honey golden colour of the entire city which is known as bath stone.

From wiki: ‘Bath Stone is an oolitic limestone comprising granular fragments of calcium carbonate.  Originally obtained from the Combe Down and Bathampton Down Mines under Combe Down, Somerset, its warm, honey colouring gives the World Heritage City of Bath, England its distinctive appearance.’

New Building in Bath Stone - Bath England

We were also shown new buildings which emulate the colour and style of the older buildings giving the city one cohesive look.  This was interesting to see since London is such a mish mash of buildings.  I know many people love the Shard but I can’t stand the thing (though I am slowly warming to it) and it looks out of place.

The Royal Crescent was another set of buildings that were a point of interest on the route.  Thirty luxury terrace houses in the shape of a crescent moon built between 1767 and 1774.  Nearby is a set of buildings built in a full circle called The Circus.

Royal Crescent - Bath England

With the sun shining the golden coloured city was at its best.  Of all the cities I’ve visited in England so far this is by far the prettiest.  Although it is a bit expensive so do keep that in mind.  Below was some of the few pops of colour building wise and was a welcomed break to all the bath stone.

Pop of Colour - Bath England

Georgion Architecture 2 - Bath

I highly recommend a day trip here, for a compact city there is much to see.  You could also combine a visit here with a trip to Bristol like I did but would have to extend it for the weekend.  There is nothing tiresome about Bath, well except for the all walking you will do.

13 thoughts on “Discover Bath The Golden Coloured City

      • So many! I’ll try and look for the name of the place but we love this tiny little pub there that has the best bangers & mash ever… Also, there’s an incredible vegetarian restaurant there called DeMouths which is fantastic. I don’t think you can go wrong with a visit to super touristy but cheap Sally Lunn’s either.

  1. Looks beautiful! I went as a child on a school trip and haven’t been back since – I think that’s a summer weekend break destination sorted!

    • I didn’t have a bath bun, will do when I visit with my mom in the summer. The tour bus said Georgian architecture, wiki says the dominant style is Georgian. I think the newer building in this set of pictures is Regency. The styles are very close.

  2. On my list of places to visit. I’ve been told I went there when I was very little newly returned from Nigeria, but I don’t remember. It looks quaint, in a very good way.

  3. I love Bath but I had no idea about the Jane Austen link! I really should read one work of classical fiction before I die! You had really beautiful weather when you were there. It was very foggy when we went but gave the baths an atmospheric feel. Like you, I loved the baths themselves and I would certainly like to see them again.

    I’m loving your new blog layout and your category banners in the sidebar. Very nice!

    (By the way, please excuse me – I have a little bit of catching up to do so may be commenting 5x).

    • I’d like to visit the baths at night, the pictures I’ve seen of it are gorgeous with the glow of the lights. No worries! I might be falling behind soon I’m taking an online course. Also thanks, glad you like it. I’ve been wanting to change it up a bit, I like the overall layout but just to tweak a few things. More changes coming.

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