Food / Food Review / London / Switzerland / Taste London

Taste London – Fondue

Hello again everyone! I am so pleased that my first post was well received; hopefully that will continue to be the case.

This post is about a type of food very near and dear to my heart: cheese. I love love love cheese and believe most meals can benefit from its addition. Breaded, fried, melted, baked, sliced, diced, I cannot get enough.  Some call this an unhealthy tendency and to them I say: “pssh, cheese has calcium and as a woman I am at risk for osteoporosis; so the more cheese I get, the more calcium I get.” It’s flawless logic.

Today I am going to talk about a certain way of preparing cheese, one that I fell in love with while living in Switzerland. Yes boys and girls, this post is about fondue.

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Now many people are quick to write off fondue for many reasons: it’s too much cheese, cheese is not a meal, fondue is stupid and camp and something people in the 70s used to base their parties around. But before you take that road I beg you to try authentic Swiss Fondue; it may just change your opinion. And now that winter is coming, I can’t think of a better time to give it a try.

So, without further delay, may I present: St. Moritz.

This is an absolutely charming, and very quaint, Swiss restaurant on Wardour St in the heart of Soho; perfect for a meal before the theatre or after you finish your Christmas shopping on Oxford Street.

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The inside is decorated like a Swiss chalet, complete with cowbells, flags of the different cantons, and alpine music. And it smells like heaven. The owner is Swiss so you can be secure in the knowledge that he knows what he’s doing. Everything on the menu, from the fondue to the wine is completely authentic.  In fact, every bottle of wine is imported from Switzerland.

Without fail, I always get the fondue moitie-moitie (melted gruyere and vacherin cheese) with a side of spatzli (a type of noodle that is pan-fried after being boiled). I highly recommend both dishes.  The fondue neuchateloise (gruyere and emmental) is also good, as is the fondue bourguignonne (cubes of beef that you cook in a pot of hot oil, accompanied by sauces) for the people who can’t get behind cheese. And, here’s a little insider tip, while they don’t say it on the menu, they will do a single portion of the fondue bouruignonne. This is perfect for the odd person out whose friends want cheese but they don’t.

While I have never personally tried any of the other main dishes (I can never say no to the fondue!), I have it on good authority from those who have that they are delicious as well.  You can feast on bratwurst and veal instead of cheese. They also have delicious chocolate fondue for those of you fond of that particular pudding.

At a portion of fondue starting from around £18 (other mains start at £14), it can be a bit pricy to eat here, but I implore you to try it out.  I always recommend this restaurant to friends and every person I have ever recommended it to has absolutely loved it. The food is delicious and the staff are always friendly and attentive.

Booking a table for dinner is essential for St. Moritz or you won’t get one, it is small and very popular.  If you want to eat there for lunch you are usually ok to just drop in.

Bon appétit!

St Moritz Restaurant
161 Wardour Street
London W1F 8WJ

0207 734 3324

http://www.stmoritz-restaurant.co.uk/stmoritz.htm

St Moritz is open Monday to Friday for lunch from 12 noon to 3pm
Monday to Saturday for dinner from 6pm to 11.30pm (last order)
Sunday closed

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6 thoughts on “Taste London – Fondue

  1. “This post is about a type of food very near and dear to my heart: cheese. I love love love cheese and believe most meals can benefit from its addition. “

    Me too! I love cheese. Few better foods have been created.

    Fondue is awesome. If I were in Switzerland, I’d live in that restaurant.

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